Idealease Safety Bulletin
SAFETY BULLETIN
Brought to you by Idealsafe | 847-304-3190 | http://www.idealease.com/
Warmer weather is coming!
The first day of spring is March 20th!  
 
In the last week, I have personally observed two vehicles run traffic control devices. Take time now to meet with your drivers and discuss the upcoming days ahead.  As the temperature increases, we will see the sun more often and for most of us, it has been a long winter. 
 
Caution your drivers on complacency and inattention. As a safety director, it seems that my worst accidents occurred during the
months of March and April. My drivers have spent the entire winter, being alert for changing road conditions, traffic and weather.

When t
he road conditions improved and the weather was extremely enjoyable, it was then that they let down their guard down and accidents occurred. Take the time to caution drivers and reinforce proper, defensive driving behavior. 
National Work Zone Awareness 
Week is April 7-11!

The 2014 National Work Zone Awareness Week will be held April 7-11, 2014 in Seattle, Washington. The national kick-off event rotates to a different state outside of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area every other year. Washington State was selected among 11 applicants as the 2014 host kick-off st
ate. 

For more information, check out the link below:

 
10 Tips for Driving Safely in Work  Zones:
 
* EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED!  
Normal speed limits may be reduced, traffic lanes may be changed, and people may be working on or near the road. 
* SLOW DOWN! 
Speeding is one of the major causes of work zone crashes. 
* DON'T TAILGATE! KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE BETWEEN YOU AND THE CAR AHEAD OF YOU.
The most common crash in a highway work zone is the rear end collision. So, don't tailgate.
* KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE BETWEEN YOUR VEHICLE AND THE CONSTRUCTION WORKERS AND THEIR EQUIPMENT.
* PAY ATTENTION TO THE SIGNS!
The warning signs are there to help you and other drivers move safely through the work zone.Observe the posted signs until you see the one that says you've left the work zone.
* OBEY ROAD CREW FLAGGERS!
The flagger knows what is best for moving traffic safely in the work zone. A flagger has the same authority as a regulatory sign, so you can be cited for disobeying his or her directions. 
* STAY ALERT AND MINIMIZE DISTRACTIONS!
Dedicate your full attention to the roadway and avoid changing radio stations or using cell phones while driving in a work zone.
* KEEP UP WITH THE TRAFFIC FLOW.
Motorists can help maintain traffic flow and posted speeds by merging as soon as possible. Don't drive right up to the lane closure and then try barge in. 
* SCHEDULE ENOUGH TIME TO DRIVE SAFELY AND CHECK RADIO, TV AND WEBSITES FOR TRAFFIC INFORMATION.
Expect delays and leave early so you can reach your destination on time. Check the National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse - http://wzsafety.tamu.edu/ - for information on work zone delays throughout the country. 
* BE PATIENT AND STAY CALM.
Work zones aren't there to personally inconvenience you. Remember, the work zone crew members are working to improve the road and make your future drive better. 

The Big 12

With March Madness just around the corner, the "The Big 12" I am referring to has nothing to do with basketball, but rather is in reference to the top 12 driver violations that an FMCSA investigator is looking for in a carrier investigation. 
 
During investigations, safety investigators look at driver histories of the worst violations of FMCSA's regulations. In particular, they look at 12 so-called "Red Flag Violations" or "The Big 12". According to the FMCSA, they always investigate these 12 items to determine if the issues have been corrected.

There are now 12 Red Flag Violations, although FMCSA says the list can change anytime. The table below details them, along with both the BASIC and the regulation each violates.

BASICs FMCSR Part Violation Description 
Driver Fitnesss 383.21
Operating a commercial motor
vehicle (CMV) with more than one
driver's license 
Driver Fitnesss 383.23(a)(2)                   Operating a CMV without a valid
commercial driver's license (CDL)
Driver Fitnesss 383.51(a) Driving a CMV (CDL) while
disqualified
Driver Fitnesss 383.91(a) Operating a CMV with improper CDL
group
Driver Fitnesss 391.11 Unqualified driver
Driver Fitnesss 391.11(b)(5) Driver lacking valid license for type
of vehicle being operated 
Driver Fitness 391.11(b)(7) Driver disqualified from operating
CMV
Driver Fitness 391.15(a) Driving a CMV while disqualified
Controlled Substances/Alcohol 392.4(a) Driver uses or is in possession of
drugs
Controlled Substances/Alcohol 392.5(a) Possession/use/under influence
of alcohol less than 4 hours prior
to duty
Fatigued Driving (HOS) 395.13(d) Driving after being declared
out-of-service (OOS)
Vehicle Maintenance 396.9(c)(2) Operating an OOS vehicle

February is American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women, but heart disease is preventable and controllable.

Recognizing a Stroke

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

Doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:
S: Ask the individual to SMILE.
T: Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)
(i.e. It is sunny out today)
R: Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks , call  an emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

*New Sign of a StrokeStick out Your Tongue 
 
Ask the person to  stick out his tongue. If the tongue is 'crooked', if it goes to one side or the other, that is also an indication of a stroke.
 
 CLICK HERE to look for the Heart-Check mark to find products in the grocery store that can help you make smarter choices about the foods you eat.
 
AMERICAN HEART MONTH FACTS: Love yourself more than the salt shaker. Eat less sodium daily to help lower your blood pressure.
Registration is Now Open On Line for the 2014 Idealease/NPTC Safety Seminars

Idealease, its affiliates and the National Private Truck Council (NPTC) will again be hosting safety seminars in 2014. The one-day seminars will focus on basic safety and compliance, regulation changes and CSA. The seminars will be available to all Idealease customers, potential customers and NPTC members at no charge. The seminar provides important information applicable for both the novice and experienced transportation professionals. 

To view the schedule and register for an upcoming seminar in 2014 click on the following link:


February 21st, 2014
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While doing my 
pre-trip inspection, I noticed a cut in the side wall of one of my tires, is this out of service violation?
 
Answer: It is an out of service violation if the sidewall is cut, worn, or damaged to the extent that the ply cord is exposed. (393.75(a))
 

 

  

 
 







































































































































Safety Seminar Schedule: 
 
11-Mar: Miami, FL 
12-Mar: Fort Myers, FL
13-Mar: Tampa, FL
18-Mar: Chattanooga, TN
19-Mar: Atlanta, GA
20-Mar: Birmingham, AL
25-Mar: El Paso, TX
26-Mar: Memphis, TN
27-Mar: Kansas City, MO
27-Mar: Commerce, CA
1-Apr: Charlottesville, VA
2-Apr: Baltimore, MD
3-Apr: Landover, MD
8-Apr: Cleveland, OH
9-Apr: Dayton, OH
10-Apr: Lexington, KY
16-Apr: Philadelphia, PA
16-Apr: Lodi, CA
17-Apr: San Leandro, CA
17-Apr: Newburgh, NY
22-Apr: Wausau, WI
23-Apr: Dubuque, IA
23-Apr: Weirton, WV
24-Apr: Milwaukee, WI
24-Apr: Butler, PA
29-Apr: Harrisburg, PA
30-Apr: Greensboro, NC
1-May: Erie, PA
1-May: Columbia, SC
6-May: Toronto, Ontario
6-May: Everett, WA
8-May: Denver, CO
8-May: Edmonton, AB
13-May: South Bend, IN
14-May: Chicago, IL
15-May: Springfield, IL

The Idealease Safety Bulletin is provided for Idealease affiliates and their customers and is not to be construed as a complete or exhaustive source of compliance or safety information. The Idealease Safety Bulletin is advisory in nature and does not warrant, guarantee, or otherwise certify compliance with laws, regulations, requirements, or guidelines of any local, state, or Federal agency and/or governing body, or industry standards.