In This Issue:
2015 International Roadcheck Results Released
URS Requirements to Be Delays
FMCSA Revises Onboard Recorder Guidance to Allow Driver to Make Corrections
34-Hour Restart Enforcement Delayed
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Idealease Safety Bulletin


2015 International Roadcheck Results Released

On September 29, 2015, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) released the results of its annual safety and enforcement outreach event, International Roadcheck. CVSA inspectors carried out 69,472 inspections across North America, 44989 of which were North American Standard Level I Inspections, which is the most thorough roadside inspection. These inspections found 1,623 or 3.6 percent of drivers and 9,732 or 21.6 percent of vehicles with out-of-service (OOS) violations, which are the lowest OOS levels for which CVSA has data, back to 1991.

A Level 1 Inspection consists of 37 items that examine the driver's record of duty status and the safety of the vehicle. Items checked include driver's license, endorsements, seat belt usage, alcohol and/or drug use, brakes, cargo securement, coupling devices, lights, tires, steering, emergency exists, and electric systems. Other inspections conducted during this year's event included Level II walk-around, Level III driver-only, and Level V vehicle-only inspections.

During each year's event, there is a special emphasis on a category of violations; Cargo Secure-meant was this year's emphasis. Inspectors issued 2,439 violations for this category. The leading violations, by number of violations issued, were: (1) failure to prevent shifting/loss of load; (2) failure to secure truck equipment; (3) damaged tie downs; (4) insufficient tie downs; and (5) loose tie downs.

Since 1988, when the CVSA began International Roadcheck, more than 1.4 million inspections have been performed across North America.

International Roadcheck 2015 Facts
Click here to learn more about driver inspection statistics, vehicle inspection facts and a data chart of out-of-service (OOS) violation distributions throughout North America for International Roadcheck 2015.
 

URS Requirements to Be Delayed

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has announced that implementation of new requirements under the Unified Registration System will be delayed, perhaps as much as up to one year.  The FMCSA intends to publish a notice in early October that will set out the revised scheduled for roll out of the new requirements.
 
The second phase of the agency’s Unified Registration System was scheduled to go into effect on October 23, 2015.  As of that date:
 
  • All private motor carriers transporting hazardous materials must file with the FMCSA evidence of minimum levels of financial responsibility (liability insurance).  The agency is requiring insurers, surety companies, and financial institutions to convert to a web-based format when electronically filing evidence of financial responsibility (49 CFR 387.323).  The FMCSA will address minimum financial responsibility limits and filings for non-hazmat private carriers in a separate rulemaking.
 
  • Use of the revised Motor Carrier Identification Report, Form MCSA-1, will be required to register with FMCSA and update registration information periodically as necessary. Entities that already have a USDOT Number do not need to file the Form MCSA–1 until they need to update registration information. The FMCSA will require regulated entities to fill out and update their registration information electronically using a web-based, online version of Form MCSA–1.  The Form MCS-150 will only be used for Mexico-domiciled carriers, and the Forms MCS-150B and MCS-150C will be eliminated.
 
  • The use of MC numbers to identify for-hire motor carriers will be eliminated.  All carriers, private and for-hire, will be identified solely by their USDOT numbers.
In addition, by April 25, 2016, all, private and for-hire motor carriers, brokers and freight forwarders were supposed to file with the FMCSA a list of agents for service of process in every state where they operate commercial motor vehicles. The new dates for implementation will be included in the October notice from the FMCSA

FMCSA Revises Onboard Recorder Guidance to Allow Drivers to Make Corrections

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has revised its guidance pertaining to automatic onboard recording devices (a form of e-log) to give drivers a chance to correct inaccurate information.

The guidance states that “within certain limits, a driver must be allowed to review his or her AOBRD records, annotate and correct inaccurate records, enter any missing information, and certify the accuracy of the information.

” FMCSA says the AOBRD has to keep the original entries and reflect the date, time and name of the person making edits to the information. “Drivers’ supervisors may request that a driver make edits to correct errors, but the driver must accept or reject such requests,” FMCSA says in the Federal Register entry announcing the change.

Related ‘Restart rollback’ should stay in effect until at least December, says TCA’s Heller in regulatory updateTCA's David Heller: “Everybody can relate to operating under a rule that doesn’t make sense,” he said. “We’re looking for an rule that makes ...Driving time cannot be edited except with unidentified or team drivers and when driving time was assigned to the wrong driver or no driver at all, FMCSA says.

AOBRDs came about in the mid-1980s are a replacement for paper logs, and FMCSA published its first regulatory guidance concerning amending the devices’ info in 1997. The agency said it acknowledges that drivers “need to be able to make legitimate corrections to their electronic AOBRD records.” The new regulatory guidance will be effective the date it’s published in the Federal Register. It’s scheduled to be published Friday, Oct. 2.

 
Hurricane Ericka

34-Hour Restart Enforcement Delayed

On October 1, 2015, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced that it has completed the data-collection phase of its 34-hour restart study but says it won't resume full enforcement of the restart rule until it submits a final report to Congress "by the end of the year."

In December 2014, the FMCSA was forced by Congress to stop enforcing restrictions on when and how often truck drivers could restart their weekly 60- or 70-hour clocks. Enforcement could not resume until the later of either Sept. 30, 2015, or the date the FMCSA completes a scientific study of the restart rule and submits a report to Congress.

Prior to July 1, 2013, truck drivers could get a restart by taking 34 hours off duty at any time. After that date, restarts had to include two nights of rest (including the hours of 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.) and could only be taken once per 168 hours.

The FMCSA's study involved real-world data collection to compare fatigue and safety among those who used the restart as it existed before July 1, 2013, and those using the more restrictive version.
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October 2, 2015


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34-Hour Restart Enforcement Delayed
On October 1, 2015, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced that it has completed the data-collection phase of its 34-hour restart study but says it won't resume full enforcement of the restart rule until it submits a final report to Congress "by the end of the year."
In December 2014, the FMCSA was forced by Congress to stop enforcing restrictions on when and how often truck drivers could restart their weekly 60- or 70-hour clocks. Enforcement could not resume until the later of either Sept. 30, 2015, or the date the FMCSA completes a scientific study of the restart rule and submits a report to Congress.
Prior to July 1, 2013, truck drivers could get a restart by taking 34 hours off duty at any time. After that date, restarts had to include two nights of rest (including the hours of 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.) and could only be taken once per 168 hours.
The FMCSA's study involved real-world data collection to compare fatigue and safety among those who used the restart as it existed before July 1, 2013, and those using the more restrictive version.

 

NEWS:

Fire Prevention Week
October 4-10, 2015

Drug Free Workplace Week
October 12 - 17, 2015

Operation Safe Driver Week
October 18-24, 2015

 


Sign Up Now for one of Seven Safety Seminars to be held this Fall!

Idealease, its members and the National Private Truck Council NPTC will again be hosting safety seminars in 2015. The one day seminars this year will focus on basic safety and compliance, regulation changes and CSA. The seminars and will be provided to all Idealease customers, potential customers and NPTC members at no charge. The seminar provides important information applicable for both the novice and experienced transportation professionals.

October 7
Erie, PA
October 13
Toledo, OH
October 14
Grand Rapids, MI
October 14
Charlotte, NC
October 20
Las Vegas, NV
October 21
Los Angeles, CA
October 22
San Martin, CA

To register for an upcoming seminar in 2015 click on the following link:

www.idealease.com/safety-seminar-registration
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