From:                              Idealease <davehelge@idealease.com>

Sent:                               Friday, July 31, 2015 4:44 PM

To:                                   mchapman@tricotruck.com

Subject:                          Idealease Safety Bulletin - California Biennial Inspection of Terminal (BIT) Program Changes Effective 1-1-16

 

In This Issue:
California Biennial Inspection of Terminal (BIT) Program Changes
Brake Safety Week
Results Released from CVSA’s One-Day Brake Check
GAO Report - Hours of Service Rule
FMCSA - Rulemaking Recommendations Of Driver Training Committee
Idealease Safety Seminars

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Idealease Safety Bulletin



California Biennial Inspection of Terminal (BIT) Program Changes Effective 1-1-16

For those of you who have attended our Idealease Safety Seminars in the past few years we have had numerous discussions with the CHP enforcement officers at our seminars regarding rumored changes to the CA BIT program.

The changes are now coming to California’s Biennial Inspection of Terminal (BIT) program effective January 1, 2016.  Based on Governor Brown having signed AB 529 last October, some key aspects of the program, including who is required to participate, will change. In addition to those WFA members already subject to the California BIT program, smaller vehicles and combinations as detailed in the California Vehicle Code 34500 (j) and 34500 (k), such as 2 axle trucks, or truck and trailer combinations exceeding 10,000 manufacturers gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) will be subject in the new 2016 regulations. Basically, California’s laws, which have long stood as an outlier from the rest of the United States, will be modified to closer mirror federal regulations when it comes to priority selection systems, methodologies and performance data analysis.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2016, California Highway Patrol is required to implement a performance-based truck terminal inspection priority system similar to that of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). The new system will place priority on motor carrier terminals that have never before been inspected. As part of the new mandate, CHP must create a database to track performance-based information, such as accident information, citations, and roadside inspection history.

The new law mandates:

The department shall adopt rules and regulations establishing a performance-based truck terminal inspection selection priority system. In adopting the system’s rules and regulations, the department shall incorporate methodologies consistent with those used by the FMCSA, including those related to the quantitative analysis of safety-related motor carrier performance data, collected during the course of inspection or enforcement contact by authorized representatives of the department or any authorized federal, state, or local safety official, in categories, including, but not limited to, driver fatigue, driver fitness, vehicle maintenance, and controlled substances and alcohol use.

Though its meaning is changing from Biennial Inspection of Terminal program to Basic Inspection of Terminal program, the BIT acronym will remain.

Read the full bill text.

How does this help you?

One of the good things about the new legislation is that it does away with the mandatory terminal inspection every 25. Because inspections will be based on need, targeting poor performing companies for BIT audit, those who demonstrate good safety management practices are allowed up to six years between terminal inspections.
 


Brake Safety Week September 6-12

A brake out of adjustment is the highest frequency violation during a roadside inspection.

Professional drivers typically will maintain a space cushion between them and the vehicles in front of them. When applying the brakes they will usually apply the brakes with 15% to 25% air application. Only in a defensive action will a driver apply the brakes with greater than 60% air application. These braking incidents are referred to as “Panic Stops” or “Rapid De-acceleration Occurrences.” Analysis reflects that most professional drivers will require less than 6 of this type of brake application per 1,000 miles driven.

Most International trucks are equipped with a “Stroke Sensitive” automatic adjuster. This type of slack adjuster adjusts the brakes on the return stroke.

This adjustment occurs only when the application is greater than 60%. The better the driver, the less opportunity there is for the automatic slack adjuster to make a brake adjustment. To ensure that the brakes are always in adjustment, we recommend the following:

An automatic slack adjuster will adjust approximately ½ inch with every 10 full brake applications.

Including this procedure as part of your pre-trip inspection will ensure that your brakes are always fully in adjustment. In the event of a roadside inspection, repeat this process while waiting your turn in line for the inspection process. This will insure that you are not red-tagged, due to a slack adjuster “Out-of-Service” condition or receive a violation. After completing this procedure and the brakes are still not adjusted or are inspected and found to be out-of-service, then it indicates there is a problem with the adjuster, with the adjuster’s installation or with related foundation brake components.

AS A DRIVER, DO NOT TRY TO MANUALLY ADJUST AN AUTOMATIC SLACK!!

The following is the Air Brake Inspection Procedure that will be used by the CVSA inspectors during Brake Safety Week:

Inspection Items:

  • Driver License
  • Registration
  • Low Air Warning Device
  • Pushrod Travel (Adjustment)
  • Brake Linings/Drums
  • Air Loss Rate (If leak detected)
  • Tractor Protection System


Operation Air Brake Inspection Procedure:
 

Step 1:

Choose the Inspection Site

Step 2:

Safety Considerations

Step 3:

Check Air Brake Mechanical Components

Step 4:

Check Steering Axle Air Brake Mechanical Components

Step 5:

Check Brake Adjustment

Step 6:

Build the Air Pressure to 90 - 100 PSI

Step 7:

Check the Air Brake ABS System (If Applicable)

Step 8:

Test Air Loss Rate

Step 9:

Test Low Air Pressure Warning Device

Step 10:

Check the Tractor Protection System

Step 11:

Finalize paperwork, and provide the results to the driver (i.e. out-of-service, etc.)


 


Results Released from CVSA’s One-Day Brake Check May 6, 2015

On May 6, 2015, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) conducted its unannounced annual brake check as part of its Operation Airbrake program. CVSA-certified inspectors checked 6,337 commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in 32 U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

Results of the brake check include the following:

  • 9 percent of CMVs checked were placed out of service for brake stroke violations, compared to 9.5 percent in 2014.
  • 7.7 percent of CMVs checked were placed out of service for brake component violations, compared to 8.5 percent in 2014.
  • CMVs that were equipped with brakes that had manual adjusters were 2.5 times more likely to be out of adjustment than CMVs with self-adjusting brake adjusters.

During the week of September 6, 2015, many states will participate in the CVSA's "Brake Safety Week," when commercial vehicle inspectors will be inspecting brakes to verify compliance. Along with doing that, they will be informing operators about the importance of proper brake maintenance.

Read the full bill text.

How does this help you?

One of the good things about the new legislation is that it does away with the mandatory terminal inspection every 25. Because inspections will be based on need, targeting poor performing companies for BIT audit, those who demonstrate good safety management practices are allowed up to six years between terminal inspections.

 

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July 31, 2015


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GAO Report Supports Positive Safety Impact of Hours-of-Service Rule

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released a response today to the recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report that examined the Agency’s 2014 study on the hours-of-service (HOS) changes that were made in 2011 and implemented in 2013.  The report also examined the rule’s assumptions and effects. The HOS rules govern the amount of time commercial truck drivers transporting freight can work and drive on a daily and weekly basis.  The response from FMCSA acknowledged the recommendations of the report and agreed to implement those suggestions.

“This GAO report provides further evidence that the changes FMCSA made to the HOS rules improve highway safety by saving lives and lowering the risk of driver fatigue,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “This reinforces our belief that these life saving measures are critical to keeping people safe on the roads. We value the GAO’s independent review and will use their recommendations to further strengthen our Department’s research to ensure that we have the best data available to keep our roads safe.”

During the nearly 18 months in which the new restart provisions were in effect, the GAO report found evidence of reduced driver fatigue and enhanced roadway safety.  Specifically, the report found:

  • fewer fatal crashes;
  • fewer drivers working the maximum schedules;
  • lower risk of driver fatigue; and
  • no increase in crashes during the 5 a.m. to 9 a.m. morning rush hour

Review of fmcsa research study and rule impact assumptions: The GAO report (GAO-15-641) also concluded that FMCSA’s HOS study data support the finding that the provision requiring drivers taking a restart to be off-duty for two nights reduces fatigue. The report found that the analysis and conclusion in FMCSA’s field study were supported by the data, and it confirmed FMCSA’s assumption that the rule would most likely impact those drivers working the longest permissible hours.

See more at:

http://www2.idealease.com/e/36492/vice-rule-sthash-WTrPoEAS-dpuf/295jyx/331985995


FMCSA Publishes Rulemaking Recommendations Of Driver Training Committee

The Entry-Level Driver Training Advisory Committee has submitted its recommendations to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on minimum curriculum requirements, hours of classroom and behind-the-wheel instruction, definitions and other standards for entry-level driver training.  The recommendations will be considered by the FMCSA as it develops a proposed rulemaking, which is expected to be published this fall.
 
The recommended standards would apply to any driver seeking to obtain a new CDL or upgrade an existing CDL.  The FMCSA is not required to accept all of the recommendations in its proposed rule, but the report is the result of a consensus of 26 committee members meeting over several months to develop these standards.


Sign Up Now for one of Seven Safety Seminars to be held this Fall!

Idealease, its members and the National Private Truck Council NPTC will again be hosting safety seminars in 2015. The one day seminars this year will focus on basic safety and compliance, regulation changes and CSA. The seminars and will be provided to all Idealease customers, potential customers and NPTC members at no charge. The seminar provides important information applicable for both the novice and experienced transportation professionals.

October 7

Erie, PA

October 13

Toledo, OH

October 14

Grand Rapids, MI

October 14

Charlotte, NC

October 20

Las Vegas, NV

October 21

Los Angeles, CA

October 22

San Martin, CA


To register for an upcoming seminar in 2015 click on the following link:

www.idealease.com/safety-seminar-registration

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The Idealease Safety Bulletin is provided for Idealease affiliates and their customers and is not to be construed as a complete or exhaustive source of compliance or safety information. The Idealease Safety Bulletin is advisory in nature and does not warrant, guarantee, or otherwise certify compliance with laws, regulations, requirements, or guidelines of any local, state, or Federal agency and/or governing body, or industry standards.

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